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SEMINAR TOPICS CATEGORY

Engineering Topics Category

E-Intelligence

Added on: February 6th, 2012 by Afsal Meerankutty No Comments

Organizations have, over the years, successfully employed business intelligence tools like OLAP and data warehousing to improve the supply of business information to end users for cross industry applications like finance and customer relationship management, and in vertical markets such as retail, manufacturing, healthcare, banking, financial services, telecommunications, and utilities. In the recent years, the Internet has opened up an entirely new channel for marketing and selling products. Companies are taking to e-business in a big way. The issue facing end users as organizations deploy e-business systems is that they do have not had the same business intelligence capabilities available to them in e-business systems as they do in the traditional corporate operating environment. This prevents businesses from exploiting the full power of the Internet as a sales and marketing channel.

As a solution, vendors are now developing business intelligence applications to capture and analyze the information flowing through e-business systems, and are developing Web-based information portals that provide an integrated and personalized view of enterprise-wide business information, applications, and services. This advanced business intelligence systems are called E-intelligence systems.

The Hy-Wire Car

Added on: February 6th, 2012 by Afsal Meerankutty 1 Comment

Hy-Wire Car is without mechanical and hydraulic linkage end engine. Instead of these it contain a fuel cell stack and a drive by wire system. It is fully automated car it is a future car. In future it will have a wide application. The problem with fuel consumption and pollution can be minimize to certain level.

Cars are immensely complicated machines, but when you get down to it, they do an incredibly simple job. Most of the complex stuff in a car is dedicated to turning wheels, which grip the road to pull the car body and passengers along. The steering system tilts the wheels side to side to turn the car, and brake and acceleration systems control the speed of the wheels.

Given that the overall function of a car is so basic (it just needs to provide rotary motion to wheels), it seems a little strange that almost all cars have the same collection of complex devices crammed under the hood and the same general mass of mechanical and hydraulic linkages running throughout. Why do cars necessarily need a steering column, brake and acceleration pedals, a combustion engine, a catalytic converter and the rest of it?

According to many leading automotive engineers, they don’t; and more to the point, in the near future, they won’t. Most likely, a lot of us will be driving radically different cars within 20 years. And the difference won’t just be under the hood — owning and driving cars will change significantly, too.

Airborne Internet

Added on: February 6th, 2012 by Afsal Meerankutty 2 Comments

The Airborne Internet is network in which all nodes would be located in aircraft. The network is intended for use in aviation communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) and would also be useful to businesses, private Internet users, and military. In time of war, for example, an airborne network might enable military planes to operate without the need for a communications infrastructure on the ground. Such a network could also allow civilian planes to continually monitor each other’s positions and flight paths.

Airborne Internet is network will serve tens of thousands of subscribers within a super-metropolitan area, by offering ubiquitous access throughout the networkâ„¢s signal “footprint”. The aircrafts will carry the “hub” of a wireless network having a star topology. The aircrafts will fly in shifts to provide continuous service, 24 hour per day by 7 days per week, with an overall system reliability of 99.9% or greater. At least three different methods have been proposed for putting communication nodes aloft. The first method would employ manned aircraft, the second method would use unmanned aircraft, and the third method would use blimps. The nodes would provide air-to-air, surface-to-air, and surface-to-surface communications. The aircraft or blimps would fly at altitudes of around 16 km, and would cover regions of about 40 mi (64 mi) in radius. Any subscriber within this region will be able to access the networkâ„¢s ubiquitous multi-gigabit per second “bit cloud” upon demand. what the airborne internet will do is provide an infrastructure that can reach areas that don’t have broadband cables & wires. Data transfer rates would be on the order of several gigagabits per second, comparable to those of high-speed cable modem connections. Network users could communicate directly with other users, and indirectly with conventional Internet users through surface-based nodes.

Like the Internet, the Airborne Network would use TCP/IP as the set of protocols for specifying network addresses and ensuring message packets arrive. This technology is also called High Altitude Long Operation (HALO) The concept of the Airborne Internet was first proposed at NASA Langley Research Center’s Small Aircraft Transportation System (SATS) Planning Conference in 1999.

Flywheel Energy Storage

Added on: January 26th, 2012 by Afsal Meerankutty 1 Comment

Energy Storage is becoming increasingly important with the advent of individual electronic devices and the rising need to accommodate a greater population which relies on these devices. A flywheel is simple form of mechanical (kinetic) energy storage. Energy is stored by causing a disk to spin on its axis. Flywheels are one of the most promising technologies for replacing conventional lead acid batteries as energy storage systems for a variety of applications including automobiles, economical rural electrification systems, and stand-alone, remote power units commonly used in the telecommunications industry.

Commercially available Flywheel Energy Storage (FES) Systems are used for small uninterpretable power systems. More recently, the flywheel has regained consideration as a viable means of supporting a critical load during mains power interruption, due to the lower capital expense and extended run time now available from many systems, as well as continued customer dissatisfaction with traditional electrochemical energy storage.